News

Find updates on the work of our researchers here, as well as news about recent advances in Alzheimer's science, funding and awareness.

Women and Alzheimer’s: A new website provides information, guidance and help

Women develop Alzheimer’s disease at twice the rate of men, and by the age of 75 a woman is three times more likely to have Alzheimer’s than a man. Now a new website created by one of the nation’s premier Alzheimer’s research support organizations, Cure Alzheimer’s Fund, is committed to providing women with information dedicated to their struggle with this devastating illness. The website link is WomenandAlzheimers.org.

Response to Proposed 2018 Budget Reductions for NIH

The release Thursday, March 16, of the President’s Fiscal Year 2018 Budget Blueprint is the first step in a long process. There will be many opportunities for Cure Alzheimer’s Fund to offer its expertise to the Trump Administration and Congress about the need for continued and increased funding of Alzheimer’s disease research and the value of public-private partnerships in defeating this disease.

Alzheimer’s and the Gut Microbiome

It may not be surprising to learn that brain health is intricately linked to the state of the rest of the body. But what are the links, and what role do these connections play in diseases like Alzheimer’s? Sam Sisodia, Ph.D., of the University of Chicago, is examining one of the most important connections: the way in which our gut microbiome influences the brain in Alzheimer’s disease.

$50 Million in Research Funding

At the end of 2016 Cure Alzheimer’s Fund hit a significant milestone: surpassing $50 million in research funding since its inception 12 years ago. Growing awareness of the disease and the need for research has enabled us to gain momentum, fund more projects and get closer to a cure.

"Alzheimer's Outlook Far From Bleak": JAMA Interview With Tanzi, Zlokovic

In an interview with the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Drs. Rudy Tanzi and Berislav Zlokovic of the Cure Alzheimer's Research Consortium discuss why recent drug trials produced less-than-promising results, and why they are optimistic about the future of the field.

The Alzheimer’s Piano—‘Making Memories’

Last fall, “Play Me, I’m Yours,” a public display featuring 60 pianos designed by local artists and placed in public spaces, returned to Boston. One of the pianos was designed by Newburyport, Massachusetts, artist Jeff Monahan. “Making Memories” featured large word graphics to show the connection between music and the brain.

Partnering for Cures

In the world of medicine, collaboration is key. Individuals can learn from each other, share their progress and inspire new approaches to developing cures. That’s the philosophy of FasterCures, Michael Milken’s organization that sponsors Partnering for Cures, an annual conference that brings together hundreds of leaders from around the world to accelerate getting new therapies into the hands of patients. 

One Family’s Experience is a Lesson Learned for All

Martha B. Capps of Raleigh, North Carolina, was a loving and caring mother to two children and a homemaker for most of her adult life. She also was a kind and trusting person. When Capps inherited a large sum of money from her aunt, she put her financial security in the hands of someone she thought to be trustworthy. 

21st Century Cures Act Signed Into Law

Cure Alzheimer's Fund is excited to share that the 21st Century Cures Act was today signed into law by President Obama. The legislation will substantially increase federal funding for medical research, and aims to improve and accelerate the approval process for new drug treatments.

The bill passed with overwhelming bipartisan support, showing widespread awareness of the need for more research funding and speedier drug development. Outside of government, the legislation was also championed by the drug industry, patient advocates, and academic institutions.

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund and Rotary Co-Fund Research on Women and Alzheimer’s

Cure Alzheimer’s Fund and Rotary joined forces this fall to fund research into why women are more likely to get Alzheimer’s disease than men.