Bart De Strooper, M.D., Ph.D.

Director, VIB-KU Leuven Center for Brain and Disease Research
Professor of Molecular Medicine; Scientific Director, Department of Molecular and Developmental Genetics, KU Leuven
Visiting Professor; Director, UK Dementia Research Institute, University College London



Bart De Strooper is a professor of molecular medicine at the University of Leuven, KU Leuven and since 2013 he is visiting professor at University College London. He is also departmental director of the VIB Center for the Biology of Disease at VIB, the Flemish Institute for Biotechnology. He is head of the Laboratory for the Research of Neurodegenerative Diseases.

Bart De Strooper’s scientific work is focused on the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that underlie Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. His major findings are the role of presenilin/gamma-secretase in the proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein and Notch, the role of PARL in mitochondrial apoptosis, and the decrease of microRNA132 in Alzheimer's disease.

He received his M.D. in 1985 and Ph.D. in 1991 from KU Leuven. He did a postdoc in the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, in the laboratory of Carlos Dotti.

Together with Christian Haass, Bart De Strooper received the Potamkin Award of the American Academy of Neurology in 2002. Other awards include the 2003 Alois Alzheimer Award of the Deutscher Gesellschaft für Gerontopsychiatrie und psychotherapie, the Joseph Maisin Prize in 2005 for fundamental biomedical sciences, awarded by the FWO Flanders every 5 years, and the 2008 Metlife Foundation Award for medical research.

Funded Research

Project Description Researchers Funding
Nanobodies to Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier

The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a vital barrier between the bloodstream and the brain. This barrier tightly controls which molecules can enter the brain. As a consequence of this barrier, the majority of currently available drugs can’t enter the brain. Importantly, to treat Alzheimer’s disease, drugs need to reach the brain. The aim of this project is to generate a universal tool that can transport drug molecules to the brain.

2016
$150,000

Selected Publications

These published papers resulted from Cure Alzheimer’s Fund support.
S. Veugelen, M. Dewilde, B. De Strooper, L. Chávez-Gutiérrez, Chapter Three - Screening and Characterization Strategies for Nanobodies Targeting Membrane Proteins, Methods in Enzymology, 584, 2017, 59–97