Scott Noggle, Ph.D.

Director of the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Laboratory
NYSCF - Charles Evans Senior Research Fellow for Alzheimer's Disease

Scott A. Noggle, Ph.D., Principal Investigator of NYSCF's scientific team, is conducting research at NYSCF's state-of-the-art laboratory and also serves as a technical and scientific resource to other researchers working in the laboratory. Scott previously managed the Tri-Institutional Stem Cell Initiative's Derivation Core facility at The Rockefeller University for two years. He was a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Ali H. Brivanlou at The Rockefeller University studying the signaling pathways that maintain pluripotency and control neural induction in hESCs (human embryonic stem cells). He received his Ph.D. from the Medical College of Georgia and his B.S. and M.S. from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. He has also been appointed an Adjunct Associate Research Scientist in Pediatrics and Molecular Genetics at Columbia University.

Funded Research

Project Description Researchers Funding
Stem Cell Consortium Year 2

Stem cells are the least mature cells in the body. Because these cells are so immature, they can be treated with a defined cocktail of factors and, depending on which factors are used and in what sequence, those factors can cause maturation of cells along discrete cell types. With a new tool called induced pluripotent stem cells, it now is possible to take skin cells from adults and return them to this immature state. By redirecting skin cells from Alzheimer’s patients and turning them into nerve cells, we are able to study adult Alzheimer’s neurons (nerve cells) in the lab.

2014
$400,000
Stem Cell Consortium

Stem cells are the least mature cells in the body. Because these cells are so immature, they can be treated with a defined cocktail of factors and, depending on which factors are used and in what sequence, those factors can cause maturation of cells along discrete cell types. With a new tool called induced pluripotent stem cells, it now is possible to take skin cells from adults and return them to this immature state. By redirecting skin cells from Alzheimer’s patients and turning them into nerve cells, we are able to study adult Alzheimer’s neurons (nerve cells) in the lab.

2013
$600,000

Selected Publications

These published papers resulted from Cure Alzheimer’s Fund support.

Andrew A. Sproul, Samson Jacob, Deborah Pre, Soong Ho Kim, Michael W. Nestor, Miriam Navarro-Sobrino, Ismael Santa-Maria, Matthew Zimmer, Soline Aubry, John W. Steele, David J. Kahler, Alex Dranovsky, Ottavio Arancio, John F. Crary, Sam Gandy, and Scott A. Noggle, Characterization and Molecular Profiling of PSEN1 Familial Alzheimer's Disease iPSC-Derived Neural Progenitors, PLoS ONE, 9(1), Jan 8 2014