Central Clock Influence on Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis

2018

2019

The circadian timing system regulates daily oscillations in behavior and physiologic functions. There is a growing realization that long-term circadian timing system dysfunction has serious health consequences and may directly influence various disease pathologies. This project will test the hypothesis that poor circadian rhythms mediated by a dysfunctional hypothalamic central circadian clock directly influence Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis. The long-term goal of this research is to identify possible therapeutic strategies to ameliorate the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

2018

This project will evaluate the association between circadian rhythms and cognitive function during Alzheimer’s progression. Cognitive decline is the defining feature of Alzheimer’s disease. Circadian rhythms are 24-hour oscillations in behavior and biological processes. Circadian systems are severely blunted with progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Recent studies suggest that disruptions to the circadian system occur prior to the clinical onset of memory deficits in Alzheimer’s disease.

The mechanism explaining how the circadian system impacts cognitive processes during Alzheimer’s disease progression is relatively unknown. The goal of this project is to test the hypothesis that poor circadian rhythms mediated by a dysfunctional central clock directly influences the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

The concepts and methods put forward in this project are innovative and have the potential to substantially impact the understanding for the role of circadian function in Alzheimer’s disease. The long-term goal of this research is to identify possible therapeutic strategies to ameliorate cognitive impairments and the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

 


Funding to Date

$327,201

Focus

Foundational Genetics, Pathological Pathways and Systems

Researchers

Geraldine J. Kress, Ph.D.