Converging on 9 Areas of Focus

Identification and Early Detection

Biomarkers are molecules indicating the presence of a pathology that can be detected and measured in biological samples obtained from patients. To date, an absence of biomarkers has posed a formidable challenge in the development of effective interventions and treatments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Brain imaging of different kinds recently has offered new insights, but is expensive and logistically complex, while biomarkers in blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or other accessible and easily tested bodily fluids could be part of regular medical screening protocols, enabling early and consistent AD diagnosis. 

Ultimately, using easily monitored biomarkers may allow for detection of AD at its absolute earliest stages, perhaps even before symptoms are evident, and such early detection could allow for treatment before any irreparable damage has occurred. Further, biomarkers with clinically established normal and pathological ranges would be vital for demonstrating efficacy in clinical studies, a serious challenge for the field today. An example study aims to identify a set of novel blood biomarkers and an examination of their potential application as diagnostic agents.

 

 

Project Description Researchers
Discovery of Alzheimer’s Disease Blood Biomarkers Using Phage Display Technology

Absence of biomarkers has posed a formidable challenge in the development of effective treatment for Alzheimer disease (AD). Blood-based biomarkers could offer advantages that allow for early AD diagnosis and are critical in monitoring efficacy in clinical studies. Proposed studies aim to identify a set of novel blood biomarkers and examine their potential application as diagnostic agents. Phage display is a powerful approach to engineer peptides or proteins for binding to targets of interest.